The new Citroen C3 2013

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The supermini segment is one with some fierce competition. The main contenders would have to be the Ford Fiesta, Audi A1, MINI Cooper,  Nissan Micra, etc. The list is actually quiet large, if the car is small, you know it belongs here. In this review we are looking at the Citroen C3, a supermini that gives a lot.

Over the last few years Citroen appear to be going in the right direction, they’re producing vehicles of much higher quality and I believe that more customers are shifting in their direction.

Inside and Out
Citroen understand two things very well; firstly they understand how to give an engine which will bring you further, so much further in fact that Ken Kesey would’ve done well refitting the engine of the bus with an e-HDi engine. The other thing they truly understand is how to create the illusion of spaciousness in small spaces. I reckon that if I was to give a one metre squared box to somebody in Citroen they’d give me back a one metre squared mansion. Does that make sense to you?

The Citroen C3 is a small car. There is no arguing this fact. But somehow the Citroen space magicians have been at work. The car doesn’t feel cramped. This car will take two adults in the back. Headroom is plentiful. Legroom to the front is in abundance. Maybe they are masters of illusion and by using their panoramic high rising front window they are instead creating a feeling of space as opposed to space itself. I might be going too far with this one!

Steering wheel and surrounds

Steering wheel and surrounds of the Citroen C3

Although this car does offer a lot in terms of space, I wouldn’t go selling-off the family wagon yet if you have kids though. The boot is typically small for the size of the vehicle, which mean that this car is a great run-around machine if you have a family, but if you intend on shipping them on a long journey then you should be looking at something like maybe the C4 Picasso.

The interior of the Citroen C3 is well laid out with Bluetooth connectivity, USB connection, etc. If you’re willing to spend a few euro extra on more you can also get SatNav. The centre console is a bit bland, but that would be its only fault.

Exterior styling of the Citroen C3 isn’t what I’d call special. It is classier looking than the Ford Fiesta, but if you put it beside a MINI Cooper or a Fiat 500 you can be sure it wouldn’t be picked first.

Drive
The Citroen C3 I drove offers  118Nm of torque at 2,750rpm, and the manufacturer tells us that it can travel from 0-100kmph in 12.3 seconds. The maximum speed of this particular C3 according to Citroen is 174kmph or 108.1mph. The C3 is also available with HDi 70 (manual), E-HDi 70 (Airdream) diesel engines. They offer two other petrol engines; VTi 68 (manual) and VTi 95 (EGS).

This small car is actually fun to drive. I like the suspension in the Citroen C3 and I found that it was well-able for my usual test-route. The steering wasn’t as responsive as I usually like but what it lacked there is made up by the handling in general.

Fuel Economy
As you would expect the Citroen C3 has a relatively small tank, but you can expect this to bring you a long way. My test vehicle was the VTI 82 with a 1.2 litre engine. According to Citroen the current C3 offers fuel savings of up to 23% on the preceding petrol engine on account of it being part of their “PureTech” engine range. PureTech also accounts for the CO2 emissions of this vehicle being so low burning 107g/CO2 per km.

Prices: €15095 – €20,345

Standard Equipment: Automatic activation of hazard warning lights, Aux Socket, 12 Volt Socket.

Optional Extras: eMyWay with; SatNav, 7″ colour screen, reversing camera and air freshener. Panoramic Zenith Windscreen.

SatNav

SatNav in the Citroen C3

Compare this to: Ford Fiesta, MINI Cooper, Audi A1, Toyota Yaris and much more.

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About Author

Daragh Ó Tuama

Daragh is Contributing Editor and founder of Motorhub.ie. Past and present motoring ventures include presenting MotorMouth on Newstalk 106-108FM and MPH on TG4. Daragh was also editor for Car Buyers Guide and contributor for Beo.ie. He set up the motors section on Newstalk.com and can be heard regularly on Rónán Beo @3 on Raidió na Gaeltachta. He’s a regular contributor to The Sunday World’s Motor Mouth pages and he also regularly contributes motoring content for the Irish language online magazine, NOS.ie.

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