Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace review

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Volkswagen has stretched its Tiguan SUV to deliver a seven-seat option called the Tiguan Allspace. Long overdue, the new machine has just launched in Ireland and can be ordered as a five or seven-seater.

The more family friendly ‘5+2’ will be the bigger seller but VW says there is demand for a five-seat version. When you slide the middle seats fully forward the boot can hold a whopping 760 litres. The price-walk from five to seven seats is a modest flat fee of €770.

The Tiguan Allspace gets its roominess over its sibling from a stretched wheelbase (+109mm) and overall the Allspace gains a further 215mm in body length. With all the seats down there is up to 1,920 litres (5 seat) of cargo space available (surfers rejoice). The Tiguan’s altered proportions look very smart and the Allspace is a handsome five door that looks purpose built. Not long ago most manufacturers would have just added a shed on to the back of am existing car to make the extra space! Exterior clues to the superior Tiguan include a new bonnet, roof-rails (standard), grille/headlight trim treatment and a new rear diffusor, and otherwise Allspace is a car that only anoraks will be able to spot from a regular Tiguan.

Inside the cabin is a class act. The usual high quality materials you’d expect from a modern VW are present and the driving position is commanding. All of the latest high tech driving aids that are available in Tiguan are available in the Allspace. Buyers will like the trailer assist that allows easy trailer maneuvering and the usual lane assist, park assist and dynamic light assist… (Have you noticed how many car companies love the word assist!)

The Allspace engine range features three 2 litre diesels and a single petrol model with a 1.4 litre TSI. The entry price point starts with the petrol engine with a six speed manual gearbox and 150hp/250nm from €34,825. While the cubic capacity of the engine relative to the car’s size seems silly, the tax band B2 car can actually move. 0-100km/h takes a modest but acceptable 9.5 seconds.

Despite the rise of petrol at the expense of ‘dirty’ diesel the Allspace range will be dominated by the diesel power and the greater pulling power (torque) that oil burners provide. The entry manual 2 litre TDI pushes out 150hp and 340nm and starts from €37,125. It is slightly slower to 100km/h (9.8 seconds) and sits in a higher tax band (C). The petrol and entry diesel model are front wheel drive only. ‘4Motion’ all wheel drive is optionally available in the diesel 150hp TDI too and standard on the other TDI’s in the range that come with either 190hp/400nm or 240hp/500nm (both DSG). The later machine can sprint from 0-100km/h in just 6.7 seconds – perfect for the late dash to school. DSG automatic is available on the TDIs and the better choice for me. The familiar VW Ireland grade structure features. Trendline is the entry point followed by Comfortline (+€4,845) then for a further €3,155 you can get in to a Highline model. The FWD Allspace can tow up to 2,200kgs (braked) and this can rise to up to 2,500kgs with 4Motion dependent on the engine choice.

On the road my 150hp TDI 4Motion Highline test car drove with confidence. The ride was premium quality and the car despite its length was narrow enough for rural roads to be tackled with little anxiety. The longer wheelbase delivers an almost class above suspension experience that passengers will enjoy.

The rearmost seats are too small for adults to endure for anything other than short hops and when all seven seats are in place the boot space, like all cars in the class, is seriously compromised at just 230 litres. The asking price of the machine on test – a cool €50,252 and this included €1,812 of extras like metallic paint and the Technology Upgrade (head up display, panoramic sunroof, lane change system ‘side assist’). The big question any potential Tiguan Allspace buyer has to ask is why not get a Skoda Kodiaq? Apart from the badge… ah, yes the badge. Some people are still unaware that Skoda is part of the Volkswagen Group. Apart from styling its machines are basically VWs! In Ireland the VW badge is seen as a posher albeit still mainstream offering, and for many buyers the emblem on their car is worth paying more for. Kodiaq prices start from €29,750 (5 seat) or from €30,750 (7 seats).

The Volkswagen Tiguan finished in 4th place in the sales charts for it class and 10th overall in Ireland in 2017. VW hopes to gain a 10% market share in 2018 overall and the Allspace variant will make up a small amount of that percentage.

 

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About Author

Michael Sheridan

Michael is Motorhub's Editor. Well known from TV and radio, Michael has been writing, presenting and judging cars since the mid 90's. He is a renowned Producer/Director and documentary film maker. Dozens of credits include: The Whole Way Round (Gay Byrne), The Shamrock Run (Alan Shortt), The Viking Run (Clodagh McKenna) and The Irish 66ers (David Mitchell) and The Climb for Kids (Colin Farrell). Print credits include: the RTE Guide (motoring editor 1999-2003), many national daily papers and Sundays including The Irish Times (freelance) plus other magazines. National radio credits include multiple at RTE Gerry Ryan show, the Mooney Show, The Dave Fanning Show, Drivetime etc. TV credits as a motoring expert include RTE's flagship current affairs show Primetime and TV3's Ireland AM. Michael also presented RTE's car show Drive! in the late 90s and directed some items in MPH2 on TG4. Michael contributes weekly on motoring issues to The Last Word show with Matt Cooper on Today FM. Michael has represented Ireland's motoring journalists in Motorsport at the International Mazda MX-5 endurance race series in Italy and the Arctic Ice Race. He has been a Car of the Year Judge for over 18 years and is a former Chairperson of the Association of Professional Motoring Press (APMP).

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